Publication:20121010105744

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Title Estimates of the Vertical Transport of Urban Aerosol Particles
Subtitles
Keywords
Publication Date 2006/01/01
Exact Publication Date Unknown
Publication Number
Publication Version
Authors Edward E. Hindman
Number of Pages 13
Original URL

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/bk-2006-0919.ch016

Working URL

http://911datasets.org/images/ACS_919_Urban_Aerosols_and_Their_Impacts_2006.torrent

Abstract URL

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/bk-2006-0919.ch016

Preprint URL


Company or Agency
Journal
Journal Issue
Book Urban Aerosols and Their Impact: Lessons Learned from the World Trade Center Tradgedy
Book Chapter 16
Book Start Page 308
Book End Page 320
doi 10.1021/bk-2006-0919.ch016
isbn 0-8412-3916-9
Cite as
Abstract Diurnal measurements obtained in urban Kathmandu, Nepal and rural Steamboat Springs, Colorado are presented to illustrate the role of convection in the vertical transport of aerosol particles in the atmosphere. At both locations, CN concentrations were a maximum during the morning and evening rush periods and a minimum during early afternoon. The vertical transport of aerosols was estimated for Steamboat Springs based on elementary meteorological principles and a method is presented for determining the verticle transport that makes use of archived meteorologocal data and analysis tools available from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Air Resources Laboratory. The boundary layer depth was seen to peak each day at about 21 UTC. The vertical extent of the plume from the collapse of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 was estimated using this method and results indicated that the plume could have risen to between 1.7 and 2 km above sea level, consistent with the observed depth. The method presented here can also be used to forecast the depth and estimate vertical mixing in the atmospheric boundary layer.
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Facts about "20121010105744"RDF feed
AbstractDiurnal measurements obtained in urban KatDiurnal measurements obtained in urban Kathmandu, Nepal and rural Steamboat Springs, Colorado are presented to illustrate the role of convection in the vertical transport of aerosol particles in the atmosphere. At both locations, CN concentrations were a maximum during the morning and evening rush periods and a minimum during early afternoon. The vertical transport of aerosols was estimated for Steamboat Springs based on elementary meteorological principles and a method is presented for determining the verticle transport that makes use of archived meteorologocal data and analysis tools available from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Air Resources Laboratory. The boundary layer depth was seen to peak each day at about 21 UTC. The vertical extent of the plume from the collapse of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 was estimated using this method and results indicated that the plume could have risen to between 1.7 and 2 km above sea level, consistent with the observed depth. The method presented here can also be used to forecast the depth and estimate vertical mixing in the atmospheric boundary layer. mixing in the atmospheric boundary layer. +
Abstract URLhttp://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/bk-2006-0919.ch016 +
AuthorsEdward E. Hindman +
BookUrban Aerosols and Their Impact: Lessons Learned from the World Trade Center Tradgedy +
Book Chapter16 +
Book End Page320 +
Book Start Page308 +
Doi10.1021/bk-2006-0919.ch016 +
Isbn0-8412-3916-9 +
Number of Pages13 +
Original URLhttp://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/bk-2006-0919.ch016 +
Publication Date1 January 2006 +
TitleEstimates of the Vertical Transport of Urban Aerosol Particles +
Working URL

http://911datasets.org/images/ACS_919_Urban_Aerosols_and_Their_Impacts_2006.torrent

+
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