Publication:20121010103330

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Title Characterization of the Plumes Passing over Lower Manhattan after the World Trade Center Disaster
Subtitles
Keywords
Publication Date 2006/01/01
Exact Publication Date Unknown
Publication Number
Publication Version
Authors Robert Z. Leifer, Graham S. Bench, Thomas A. Cahill
Number of Pages 17
Original URL

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/bk-2006-0919.ch008

Working URL

http://911datasets.org/images/ACS_919_Urban_Aerosols_and_Their_Impacts_2006.torrent

Abstract URL

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/bk-2006-0919.ch008

Preprint URL


Company or Agency
Journal
Journal Issue
Book Urban Aerosols and Their Impact: Lessons Learned from the World Trade Center Tradgedy
Book Chapter 8
Book Start Page 135
Book End Page 151
doi 10.1021/bk-2006-0919.ch008
isbn 0-8412-3916-9
Cite as
Abstract During the three-month period from October 1, 2001 to December 15, 2001 impactor measurements were carried out on the roof of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML), approximately 45 m above the street level in New York City, to characterize plumes passing over the laboratory. Depending on the wind direction it was hoped to intercept aerosols originating from the disaster of the World Trade Center. More than 25 plumes were detected in our samples. With southwest winds on October 3, an aerosol plume, transported from the WTC, was observed over EML. The total particulates collected on all stages reached a peak mass concentration of 267 μg/m3 at 08:15 with more than 39% of the mass in the 0.56 to 0.34 μm stage. The October 3rd sample showed that almost 75% of the total mass at the peak seen at EML was below 1.15 μm. The observed size distribution was bimodal and showed a strong temporal variation as the modes shifted from a dominant coarse to a fine mode. The detected plume lasted for more than 9 hours. It is this fine particulate mode that is of concern to human health exposure.
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Facts about "20121010103330"RDF feed
AbstractDuring the three-month period from OctoberDuring the three-month period from October 1, 2001 to December 15, 2001 impactor measurements were carried out on the roof of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML), approximately 45 m above the street level in New York City, to characterize plumes passing over the laboratory. Depending on the wind direction it was hoped to intercept aerosols originating from the disaster of the World Trade Center. More than 25 plumes were detected in our samples. With southwest winds on October 3, an aerosol plume, transported from the WTC, was observed over EML. The total particulates collected on all stages reached a peak mass concentration of 267 μg/m3 at 08:15 with more than 39% of the mass in the 0.56 to 0.34 μm stage. The October 3rd sample showed that almost 75% of the total mass at the peak seen at EML was below 1.15 μm. The observed size distribution was bimodal and showed a strong temporal variation as the modes shifted from a dominant coarse to a fine mode. The detected plume lasted for more than 9 hours. It is this fine particulate mode that is of concern to human health exposure.at is of concern to human health exposure. +
Abstract URLhttp://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/bk-2006-0919.ch008 +
AuthorsRobert Z. Leifer +, Graham S. Bench + and Thomas A. Cahill +
BookUrban Aerosols and Their Impact: Lessons Learned from the World Trade Center Tradgedy +
Book Chapter8 +
Book End Page151 +
Book Start Page135 +
Doi10.1021/bk-2006-0919.ch008 +
Isbn0-8412-3916-9 +
Number of Pages17 +
Original URLhttp://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/bk-2006-0919.ch008 +
Publication Date1 January 2006 +
TitleCharacterization of the Plumes Passing over Lower Manhattan after the World Trade Center Disaster +
Working URL

http://911datasets.org/images/ACS_919_Urban_Aerosols_and_Their_Impacts_2006.torrent

+
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