Publication:20121010101323

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Title Introduction to Urban Aerosols and Their Impacts
Subtitles
Keywords
Publication Date 2006/01/01
Exact Publication Date Unknown
Publication Number
Publication Version
Authors Nancy A. Marley, Jeffrey S. Gaffney
Number of Pages 21
Original URL


Working URL

http://911datasets.org/images/ACS_919_Urban_Aerosols_and_Their_Impacts_2006.torrent

Abstract URL

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/bk-2006-0919.ch001

Preprint URL


Company or Agency Argonne National Laboratory
Journal
Journal Issue
Book Urban Aerosols and Their Impact: Lessons Learned from the World Trade Center Tradgedy
Book Chapter 1
Book Start Page 2
Book End Page 22
doi
isbn 0-8412-3916-9
Cite as
Abstract Atmospheric aerosols, or particulate matter, may be solid or liquid, with effective diameters from ~0.002 to ~ 100 μm. They can be emitted in particulate form directly into the atmosphere (primary aerosols) or formed in the atmosphere by chemical reactions of gases (secondary aerosols). Aerosol sources include mechanical processes such as grinding or wind erosion, gas-to-particle conversion of gas-phase primary pollutants, and combustion processes which occur primarily in urban centers. The impact of aerosols on the environment, human health, and climate depends on their number concentration, mass, size, chemical composition, phase (i.e. liquid or solid), morphology, and surface properties. Outlined in this Chapter is a brief overview of the physical and chemical properties of atmospheric aerosols as they relate to their to potential impacts on the environment and human health.
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Facts about "20121010101323"RDF feed
AbstractAtmospheric aerosols, or particulate matteAtmospheric aerosols, or particulate matter, may be solid or liquid, with effective diameters from ~0.002 to ~ 100 μm. They can be emitted in particulate form directly into the atmosphere (primary aerosols) or formed in the atmosphere by chemical reactions of gases (secondary aerosols). Aerosol sources include mechanical processes such as grinding or wind erosion, gas-to-particle conversion of gas-phase primary pollutants, and combustion processes which occur primarily in urban centers. The impact of aerosols on the environment, human health, and climate depends on their number concentration, mass, size, chemical composition, phase (i.e. liquid or solid), morphology, and surface properties. Outlined in this Chapter is a brief overview of the physical and chemical properties of atmospheric aerosols as they relate to their to potential impacts on the environment and human health.pacts on the environment and human health. +
Abstract URLhttp://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/bk-2006-0919.ch001 +
AuthorsNancy A. Marley + and Jeffrey S. Gaffney +
BookUrban Aerosols and Their Impact: Lessons Learned from the World Trade Center Tradgedy +
Book Chapter1 +
Book End Page22 +
Book Start Page2 +
Company or AgencyArgonne National Laboratory +
Isbn0-8412-3916-9 +
Number of Pages21 +
Publication Date1 January 2006 +
TitleIntroduction to Urban Aerosols and Their Impacts +
Working URL

http://911datasets.org/images/ACS_919_Urban_Aerosols_and_Their_Impacts_2006.torrent

+
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