IKONOS

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manhattan_9-12-01_01.jpg

This one-meter resolution satellite image of Manhattan, New York was collected at 11:43 a.m. EDT on Sept. 12, 2001 by Space Imaging's IKONOS satellite. The image shows an area of white dust and smoke at the location where the 1,350-foot towers of the World Trade Center once stood. IKONOS travels 423 miles above the Earth's surface at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour. http://www.asprs.org/publications/pers/2002journal/september/highlight.html

(c) GeoEye (hires version) (original)


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manhattan_before_6_30_00.jpg

This one-meter resolution satellite image of Manhattan, New York was collected June 30, 2000 by Space Imaging's IKONOS satellite. The image, taken from the south, prominently features the 110-story World Trade Center twin towers. (source)


manhattan_9_12_01.jpg

This one-meter resolution satellite image of Manhattan, New York was collected at 11:43 a.m. EDT on Sept. 12, 2001 by Space Imaging's IKONOS satellite. The image shows an area of white and gray-colored dust and smoke at the location where the 1,350-foot towers of the World Trade Center once stood. Since all airplanes were grounded over the U.S. after the attack, IKONOS was the only commercial high-resolution camera that could take an overhead image at the time. (source)


manhattan_9_15_01.jpg

This one-meter resolution satellite image of Manhattan, New York was collected at 11:54 a.m. EDT on Saturday, Sept. 15, 2001 by Space Imaging's IKONOS satellite. The image shows the remains of the 1,350-foot towers of the World Trade Center, and the debris and dust that have settled in the area. Emergency and rescue vehicles can be seen throughout the streets in the vicinity of Ground Zero. Smoke from fires is still visible four days after the attack. (source)


manhattan_12_31_01.jpg

This one-meter resolution satellite image was taken on Dec. 31, 2001 by the IKONOS satellite to show cleanup efforts of the World Trade Center site on the last day of the year. It shows a macro view of the immense cleanup effort following the destruction of the 1,350-foot towers. Construction equipment, including multiple cranes, can be seen throughout the ground zero site. The severe shadows are due to the winter sun angle. (source)


manhattan_1_22_02.jpg

This one-meter resolution satellite image was taken on Jan. 22, 2002 by the IKONOS satellite. It shows the continuing cleanup effort six months after the attack on the 110-story World Trade Center twin towers. Snow can been seen throughout Manhattan including Ground Zero. The severe shadows are due to the winter sun angle. (source)


manhattan_6_8_02.jpg

This one-meter resolution satellite image of Manhattan, New York was taken on June 8, 2002 by the IKONOS satellite. The image shows the immense progress in the reclamation of Ground Zero in just nine months. The image was taken from the west and may be rotated for better viewing. (source)


manhattan_9_4_02.jpg

This one-meter resolution satellite image of Manhattan, New York was taken on Sept. 4, 2002 by the IKONOS satellite. The image shows the 16-acre site of Ground Zero approximately one year after the fateful attacks. A large ramp descends into the center of the site next to where the North and South Towers once stood. (source)


Pentagon_9_7_01.jpg

This one-meter resolution satellite image of the Pentagon was collected on Sept. 7, 2001 by Space Imaging's IKONOS satellite, only four days before the terrorist attack. Clearly visible are the cars in the parking lot, the Pentagon's renowned five-sided shape, the building's inners rings and its five-acre courtyard. (source)


Pentagon_9_12_01.jpg

This one-meter resolution satellite image of the Pentagon was collected at 11:46 a.m. EDT on Sept. 12, 2001 by Space Imaging's IKONOS satellite. The image shows extensive damage to the western side and interior rings of the multi-ringed building. Also visible are the emergency and rescue vehicles parked around the helipad. Since all airplanes were grounded over the U.S. after the attack, IKONOS was the only commercial high-resolution camera that could take an overhead image at the time. (source)


Pentagon_11_20_01.jpg

This one-meter resolution satellite image of the Pentagon reconstruction progress was collected on Nov. 20, 2001 by Space Imaging's IKONOS satellite. Three of the five rings of the section where the attack occurred have been completely removed. A large yellow construction crane and its shadow can clearly be seen. A large cloud is just south (left in this image) of the building and is casting a shadow. (source)


Pentagon_2_5_02.jpg

This one-meter resolution satellite image of the Pentagon reconstruction progress was collected on Feb. 5, 2002 by Space Imaging's IKONOS satellite. The three rings are still under complete reconstruction. Long shadows are prevalent on this winter image. (source)


Pentagon_6_3_02.jpg

This one-meter resolution satellite image of the Pentagon reconstruction progress was collected on June 3, 2002 by Space Imaging's IKONOS satellite. The three rings are more defined as progress continues during the reconstruction. New roof lines are taking shape in the outermost rings of the building. (source)


Pentagon_8_5_02.jpg

This one-meter resolution satellite image of the Pentagon reconstruction progress was collected on Aug. 5, 2002 by Space Imaging's IKONOS satellite. New rooflines are taking shape in the outermost rings of the building. The construction crane, which was visible in early images, has now been removed. Much of the roof of the outer ring has been completed. (source)

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